General Climate Change News

Survey on learning and training needs (European Copernicus Climate Change Service, C3S) This online survey is part of the European Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) on User Learning Services. It aims to understand training needs and requirements of users of climate information in Europe. The results will support the development of the C3S and help inform future training events and online learning to enable and increase the use of climate data and capacity building across Europe. The survey takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.
European Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), Monday 22 October 2018
48th Session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-48) The 48th session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-48) convened from 1-6 October 2018 in Incheon, Republic of Korea. A report of the meeting is available.
IISD, Wednesday 10 October 2018
Tracking land-based CO2 emissions under the Paris Agreement A study published in Nature Climate Change suggests a way forward for reconciling the different methods currently used to measure land-based greenhouse gas emissions, addressing a limit also acknowledged in the IPCC special report on 1.5oC, published on 8 October 2018.
EU Science Hub, Tuesday 9 October 2018
Summary for Policymakers of IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C The Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C was approved by the IPCC on 8 October. It will be a key scientific input into the Katowice Climate Change Conference in Poland in December (COP24), when governments review the Paris Agreement to tackle climate change.
IPCC, Monday 8 October 2018
Warmer Spring Leads to Less Plant Growth in Summer It’s bad news for the climate: plants start growing earlier in the spring but, contrary to popular belief, this results in considerably less CO2 absorption. This is shown in a study published in the journal “Nature” with the participation of TU Wien.
TU Wien, Friday 5 October 2018
Knowledge alone is‘not enough’ to prepare for future climate risks: the case of Swedish forestry Source: Andersson, E., Keskitalo, E.C.H. (2018). Adaptation to climate change? Why business-as-usual remains the logical choice in Swedish forestry. Global Environmental Change. 48: 76–85. DOI:10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.11.004.
European Commission, Science for Environment Policy, Issue 514, Thursday 27 September 2018
Arctic plants grow taller amid warming climate Plants in the Arctic are growing taller because of climate change, according to research from a global scientific collaboration. While the region is usually thought of as a vast, desolate landscape of ice, it is in fact home to hundreds of species of low-lying shrubs, grasses and other plants that play a critical role in carbon cycling and energy balance. A team led by the University of Edinburgh has discovered that the effects of climate change are behind an increase in plant height across the tundra over the past 30 years.
University of Edinburgh, Thursday 27 September 2018
Climate risks beyond adaptation? 2018 has been marked by a number of particularly severe climate-related extreme events across the globe, well in line with IPCC findings showing that the frequency, intensity and severity of climate-related hazards are being adversely shaped by anthropogenic climate change. The political, legal, economic and institutional dimensions of the issue of L&D, the normative questions central to the discourse and the political problems still to be solved, a focus on climate risks and climate risk management and salient case studies from around the world are the core of the new book “Loss and Damage from Climate Change – Concepts, Methods and Policy Options”. The book will be officially launched on Friday, September 28, 2018.
CMCC, Thursday 27 September 2018
A net-zero emission European society is within reach but getting there starts today Europe can reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 at the latest. Not only is it technically possible: a net-zero future is likely to be very desirable, with a prosperous economy, a more resilient society, and higher levels of wellbeing. This is the overall conclusion in a new report released today by the ECF and Climact.
European Climate Foundation, Thursday 27 September 2018
Paris climate targets could be exceeded sooner than expected A new study has for the first time comprehensively accounted for permafrost carbon release when estimating emission budgets for climate targets. The results show that the world might be closer to exceeding the budget for the long-term target of the Paris climate agreement than previously thought.
IIASA, Monday 24 September 2018
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